Zac Seidler is a current PhD student at The University of Sydney and clinical psychologist in training. Zac is a strong advocate for improving men's access to the mental health care that they want and need, rather than what is easiest. Whenever he broaches the topic of male depression with friends everyone sighs and says "not the men thing again," and that's how he knows the message is getting across. He loves drumming and is currently training for his first triathlon.  

Dr. Haryana Dhillon is a research fellow at The University of Sydney with a strong focus on reducing barriers to help-seeking. She has worked extensively in Cancer research and is looking to use her knowledge about what works in oncology to try and improve mental health treatment. She has a green thumb, is a passionate believer in social justice and a gin connoisseur. 

Dr. Simon Rice is a clinical psychologist and research fellow with Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health. Simon has a keen interest in the mental health of young men and how to intervene early, to get them the help they need.  He has worked closely with men across Australia, from military veterans to elite athletes, so understands better than most the difficulties all men face. He is a lover of surfing and a distance runner. 

Professor John Oliffe is founder of the Men's Health Research program at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. His work focuses on masculinities as it influences men's health behaviours and overall quality of life. His studies address diverse topics including prostate cancer, depression, suicide, smoking, and other men's health issue. Even after a few years in Canada, John's Australian blood still struggles to warm to the freezing winters. 

Dr. Andrea Fogarty is a research fellow at The Blackdog Institute. Her research to date has focused primarily on public health programs, with particular emphases on men’s mental health, depression and using digital technology to provide mental health services. Andrea is currently working with young men in sporting teams to reduce their stigma of mental illness and improve their help-seeking attitudes. 

 

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